The Law Society Medal

Each year, the Law Society of Upper Canada awards the Law Society Medal to selected lawyers who have made a significant contribution to the profession.

The award is given for outstanding service within the profession, whether in the area of practice, in the academic sphere, or in some other professional capacity where the service is in accordance with the highest ideals of the legal profession. It may be awarded for devotion to professional duties over a long term or for a single outstanding act of service.

2017 recipients

Patrick Case, Guelph
Called to the Bar in 1988, Patrick Case has shown extraordinary leadership advocating for social justice in the area of equity and racism and has led the way in establishing policies and practices on how to address racism..

Larry Chartrand, Ottawa
Called to the Bar in 1991, Larry Chartrand is widely recognized for his work advancing Aboriginal and Métis rights. He is a leader and an innovator in the study of Aboriginal Law and is one of the country’s top scholars on Métis constitutional rights.

Sarah E. Colquhoun, Thunder Bay
Called to the Bar in 1984, Sarah Colquhoun is a recognized for her leadership and advocacy, having devoted her career to increasing social justice for low income people and First Nation communities in Ontario’s Northwest.

Michael Eizenga, Toronto
Called to the Bar in 1991, Michael Eizenga has established himself as an undisputed leader in the class action Bar. He is also recognized for his outstanding commitment to public service and volunteerism.

Marie Henein, LL.B., LL.M, Toronto
Called to the Bar in 1992, Marie Henein is being recognized for her outstanding skills as a criminal defence lawyer with a deep and abiding commitment to the administration of justice and the rule of law

Joanna Radbord, Toronto>
Called to the Bar in 1999, Joanna Radbord is being recognized for her numerous contributions to LGBTQ rights, family law, constitutional and human rights in the province of Ontario.

Gary Yee, Toronto
Called to the Bar in 1985, Gary Yee is being recognized for his activism and advocacy for Chinese and other racialized communities, including the redress campaign against the Chinese Head Tax and Exclusion Act, as well as for his leadership in administrative justice and the tribunal sector.

 

medalHistory of the medal

Originally struck in 1985, the Law Society Medal has been awarded to more than 100 lawyers in recognition of distinguished service.

The Medal is made of sterling silver and is in the shape of a heraldic rose; the petals covered in white enamel. The white rose of York was chosen because it forms part of the Law Society’s coat of arms; it symbolizes the fact that the Law Society's seat was in York County, and that Toronto was called York at the time when Osgoode Hall was created in 1829.

The Law Society's motto, "Let Right Prevail," appears in a red enamel circle in the centre of the rose, surrounded by a stag. The stag came originally from the coat of arms of Sir John Beverly Robinson, an early Treasurer. A beaver was also included as it appears in the Law Society's coat of arms.

Recipients of the Medal are permitted to wear it on appropriate occasions, and can also use the designation LSM (short for Law Society Medal) after their names.

See a list of all recipients of the Law Society Medal.